PDA

View Full Version : Harddrive Problem. Drive not showing..



Cyan Winters
12-23-2006, 01:50 AM
So I decided to reformat my PC.

Since all the essential WINDOWS files were on my C: drive, and only games/movies/music were on my D: drive, I decided to back up some information from the C to the D, and then took my D drive entirely out of my computer.

I then went about reformating, deleting the C: Drive partition and creating a new one, all that jazz. Went smoothly. When all was said and done, I put the D: drive back in, expecting for it to show up and work fine, like it SHOULD.

However, this is not the case. The C: drive shows up in My Computer, but the D: is nowhere to be found.

However, the harddrive (Maxtor 300GB) is listed in the device manager, and is said to be enabled and working properly. Inspection of the Disk Manager shows that the drive is infact recognized, but is "unallocated" and requires formatting to be usable.

Now I know that my ~100 gigs of data is still on the drive. All I did was unplug and replug the drive, the data did not disappear. But Windows refuses to use it unless I format it, losing all the data.

So the question to you is, is there any way for me to get my computer to recognize my D: drive, while still being able to keep the data on it.

I've considered data retrievers, but it seems far-fetched. And if I don't get any solutions here, I suppose I'll be taking it to a computer shop.

Any ideas?

RX-7
12-23-2006, 01:59 AM
check the jumpers on the drive

RN_Max
12-23-2006, 02:33 AM
Data retrievers aren't so far fetched - I've recovered several drives that appear to be unformatted.

Data doesn't get physically erased until it is overwritten, only the file location tables and headers get wiped with a normal or quick format.

All a data recovery utility actually does is ignore the file system and raw read the drive contents, restoring file headers and location entries.

KaP Blander
12-23-2006, 03:18 AM
+1 Data retrievers!!!

Cyan Winters
12-23-2006, 03:43 AM
D#|Szt.RN_Max;187434']Data retrievers aren't so far fetched - I've recovered several drives that appear to be unformatted.

Data doesn't get physically erased until it is overwritten, only the file location tables and headers get wiped with a normal or quick format.

All a data recovery utility actually does is ignore the file system and raw read the drive contents, restoring file headers and location entries.

So would you suggest retrieving before or after formatting the drive?

And what program would you suggest using? I have GetDataBack right now, but it's free software..

BsP Firelord
12-23-2006, 01:03 PM
Why do you want to format a drive that was working properly before?
Try getting your data back with another PC.
The drive should still work if you didnīt do anything but unplug it.
Was that drive part of a RAID system?

Edit: Run that GetDataBack without formatting your drive first. Maybe it can repair the file table or something although I donīt understand why there should be a problem with that.

RN_Max
12-23-2006, 01:10 PM
I don't currently have GetDataBack, but give it a try before formatting.

If it can't handle that, then give the drive a quick-format and try again.

As things stand you have everything to gain, i.e. your data.


As for what GetDataBack can and can't do ... go to the web page next time you lazy bum ;)

http://www.runtime.org/gdb.htm


Whatever happened to your drive-

GetDataBack will recover your data if the hard drive's partition table, boot record, FAT/MFT or root directory are lost or damaged, data was lost due to a virus attack, the drive was formatted, fdisk has been run, a power failure has caused a system crash, files were lost due to a software failure, files were accidentally deleted...

Recover even when Windows doesn't recognize the drive-

GetDataBack can even recover your data when the drive is no longer recognized by Windows. It can likewise be used even if all directory information - not just the root directory- is missing.

Get everything back-

Advanced algorithms will make sure that all directories and sub directories are put together as they were, and that long file names are reconstructed correctly.

GetDataBack is safe-

GetDataBack is read-only, meaning the program will never attempt to write to the drive you are about to recover. Please make sure to read the safety instructions...


GetDataBack comes in two versions:

Note: We recommend that you download the demo version of GetDataBack first to see if your files are recoverable. The demo version allows you to perform the data recovery and to see and verify your recovered files.

A license key is then required to actually save these files. Once you have a license key for the software, you don't have to run the program again, just enter the license key in the demo version to enable the copy function.



I am blessed when it comes to software and games ... knowing people in the industry leads to all kinds of knowledge and nice offerings.

Both Runtime GetDataBack and Ontrack EasyRecovery are pretty damned good at what they do, so obtaining a copy of either is really handy for anyone who tinkers with PCs.

NOTE: Make sure you have your recovery utility installed on a different drive and that you have sufficient space to recover the contents you want.
You don't have to recover everything, as you can select personal data/saved games/etc and ignore any files installed by a program if you don't have the space for it all on another drive.

Jenkl
12-23-2006, 05:49 PM
Yeah, just to reiterate so you dont do something dumb, he means a QUICK-FORMAT. He doesnt mean do a format, quickly. I know you're not an idiot, just want to reinforce that.

Cyan Winters
12-23-2006, 06:32 PM
D|Kpt.Jenkl;187614']Yeah, just to reiterate so you dont do something dumb, he means a QUICK-FORMAT. He doesnt mean do a format, quickly. I know you're not an idiot, just want to reinforce that.

I'll try to get the data back without formatting first, so I don't have to even worry about this.

BigBlueCheese
12-23-2006, 08:58 PM
I bought this program a while back for $100

http://www.stellarinfo.com/

I too had a maxtor hard drive (200GB IDE) and it crashed a few times (was recognized by windows but inaccessible) so I've used this utility to recover it.

If you're still on IDE for hard drives (the same cables you use you connect your CD and optical drives), then I'd say upgrade to SATA. SATA is faster and actually opperates in a plug and play manner. SATA is a little (somtimes red) connector about the size of a USB.

Cyan Winters
12-23-2006, 09:38 PM
Alright, the problem is solved. Using GetDataBack I was able to recover all the files without even a quick format, and using an "aquired" liscense, I'm now in the process of transferring the data over to my C: drive before formatting the D.

Thanks for the help guys, espicially Max. :ddr:

FJG/ Arel
12-27-2006, 01:12 AM
D|SSze.Cyan Winters;187682']Alright, the problem is solved. Using GetDataBack I was able to recover all the files without even a quick format, and using an "aquired" liscense, I'm now in the process of transferring the data over to my C: drive before formatting the D.

Thanks for the help guys, espicially Max. :ddr:

Chances are that this problem was caused by a nasty feature Microsoft introduced back in Windows 2000 named dynamic disks. In short, it's a pretty much useless feature that render your partitions unreadable by other OS's and sometimes even by a Microsoft OS after a reinstall or on another machine. Luckily the data on the lost partitions can be recovered if you don't use some of the "advanced" features dynamic disks offer.

I'm glad to hear that you got your files back, but to keep it from happening again I suggest checking if you are using dynamic disks on the data drive (not sure if XP makes a disk "dynamic" by default). Open Computer Management (Start-Run -> "compmgmt.msc") and check under Disk Management whether your disks are "basic" or "dynamic". Converting from one type to the other usually destroys the partitions, so be careful. :)